Breastfeeding is great for babies and moms.

Breastfeeding helps you keep your baby healthy
When you breastfeed, your baby is less likely to get sick, or 
have to stay in the hospital due to illness. Because your breast 
milk is specially created for your baby, it can help prevent:
• Ear infections
• Diarrhea
• Respiratory illnesses (trouble breathing)
• Childhood obesity
• Childhood leukemia (blood cancer)
Feeding your baby only breast milk can cut the risk of SIDS 
by over 70 percent. (SIDS is the sudden death of a 
healthy baby without warning.)
Breastfeeding is also good for your health. Studies show 
that the longer a woman breastfeeds, the lower her risk of 
developing breast cancer and ovarian cancer. It also lowers 
her risk of diabetes. 
Learning about breastfeeding now will help you be 
prepared when your baby comes. Keep reading to see 
why breastfeeding is great — for your baby and you. 
www.womenshealth.gov/ItsOnlyNatural
More than half of 
African American 
moms start out 
breastfeeding 
their babies. 
Why? Because 
breastfeeding 
makes babies 
healthy and strong 
and builds a 
feeling of love.
Breastfeeding 
is great for 
babies and 
moms.Breastfeeding tips
• Before your baby is born, tell your partner, family, and 
friends that you plan to breastfeed and need their support.
• In the hospital, tell your doctor and nurse that you 
don’t want your baby to have formula unless there is 
a medical reason.
• It’s important to start breastfeeding as soon as you can 
after your baby is born. 
• Most hospitals will have an expert on breastfeeding who 
can answer questions and address problems. This expert 
will help you learn how to hold your baby when feeding 
and can show you how to use a breast pump. Before 
leaving the hospital, ask your nurse or the breastfeeding 
expert to make sure you are doing okay with nursing. 
They can also teach you how to keep up your milk supply 
if you are away from your baby.
• Breast milk is easier for babies to digest than formula, so 
your baby may need to eat more often.
• If you are feeling pain when you breastfeed, the baby might 
not be latched correctly. Talk to your doctor, nurse, or a 
breastfeeding expert about the pain. 
• You may worry that you’re not making enough milk, but 
your baby is likely getting more than you think at each 
feeding. Regardless of your baby’s weight, a newborn’s 
stomach is only the size of an almond. 
• If you are concerned about your ability to breastfeed 
when you go back to work or school, there are laws 
that protect your right to do so.
Breastfeeding helps you 
save money
• Feeding your baby formula will 
cost you more than $1,500 
a year (or about $30 a week). 
• Because breastfed babies are less 
likely to get sick, you 
will miss fewer days at work to 
stay home and take care 
of your baby. 

Breastfeeding helps you keep your baby healthyWhen you breastfeed, your baby is less likely to get sick, or have to stay in the hospital due to illness. Because your breast milk is specially created for your baby, it can help prevent:• Ear infections• Diarrhea• Respiratory illnesses (trouble breathing)• Childhood obesity• Childhood leukemia (blood cancer)Feeding your baby only breast milk can cut the risk of SIDS by over 70 percent. (SIDS is the sudden death of a healthy baby without warning.)Breastfeeding is also good for your health. Studies show that the longer a woman breastfeeds, the lower her risk of developing breast cancer and ovarian cancer. It also lowers her risk of diabetes. Learning about breastfeeding now will help you be prepared when your baby comes. Keep reading to see why breastfeeding is great — for your baby and you. www.womenshealth.gov/ItsOnlyNaturalMore than half of African American moms start out breastfeeding their babies. Why? Because breastfeeding makes babies healthy and strong and builds a feeling of love.Breastfeeding is great for babies and moms.Breastfeeding tips• Before your baby is born, tell your partner, family, and friends that you plan to breastfeed and need their support.• In the hospital, tell your doctor and nurse that you don’t want your baby to have formula unless there is a medical reason.• It’s important to start breastfeeding as soon as you can after your baby is born. • Most hospitals will have an expert on breastfeeding who can answer questions and address problems. This expert will help you learn how to hold your baby when feeding and can show you how to use a breast pump. Before leaving the hospital, ask your nurse or the breastfeeding expert to make sure you are doing okay with nursing. They can also teach you how to keep up your milk supply if you are away from your baby.• Breast milk is easier for babies to digest than formula, so your baby may need to eat more often.• If you are feeling pain when you breastfeed, the baby might not be latched correctly. Talk to your doctor, nurse, or a breastfeeding expert about the pain. • You may worry that you’re not making enough milk, but your baby is likely getting more than you think at each feeding. Regardless of your baby’s weight, a newborn’s stomach is only the size of an almond. • If you are concerned about your ability to breastfeed when you go back to work or school, there are laws that protect your right to do so.Breastfeeding helps you save money• Feeding your baby formula will cost you more than $1,500 a year (or about $30 a week). • Because breastfed babies are less likely to get sick, you will miss fewer days at work to stay home and take care of your baby.