A Leading Health Concern

One of the leading health concerns in the United States today is diabetes.  Currently the sixth leading cause of death among adults, diabetes has been becoming more and more prevalent.  A 2017 CDC report suggested that around 10% of our population suffers from diabetes or prediabetes, a condition that can turn into diabetes easily if left unchecked.  Last year the Chicago Sun-Times reported that we are now diagnosing upwards of 25,000 children with the disease annually--for a disease that was long thought to be mostly an adult’s issue. 

Enjoy Your 4th of July

How do you spend your holiday time?  For the Fourth of July and the weeks surrounding it, people spend a lot of time playing and partying with friends--pool parties, cookouts, firework shows, and the like claim a great deal of our time around the summer holidays.  Where there’s overloads of fun, of course, there are dangers for which to keep watch.  Here is a quick list of playtimes that can turn into danger zones quickly and a few of the hazards you might want to consider.  Mind you, we are not telling you to avoid going out and enjoying these activities, but rather reminding you to be careful and stay safe over Independence Day weekend.

Would a catheter make life easier

For those patients that have to deal with it, a fundamentally difficult part of recovering from surgery can be the process of catheterization.  If you are suffering from urinary retention for any reason, it can be not just difficult to learn the new processes that your body requires but embarrassing to even consider them.  Patients at the Woman’s Clinic will find the staff incredibly helpful and easy to work with in this regard.  They are professional and courteous and dedicated to making every patient’s stay as comfortable as possible.  Patients can also help themselves by becoming familiar with the procedures which they will have to endure. 

Don't Let a Sunburn Slow You Down

As the summer season kicks into high gear, more and more people are going to start complaining to their friends about sunburn. “I got burnt walking to the car!”  “30 minutes painting the porch, and now I’m bright red!”  The fact is, almost everyone has been sunburned at one point or another by the time they reach adulthood.  It is sometimes uncomfortable, sometimes outright painful, and always should be avoided if possible.

Working out in the Summer

Summer in the South can make the whole world seem heavier.  The humidity and heat combine to feel like a weight over existence.  An act as simple as dragging oneself out of bed can seem extraordinary and heroic.  However, it is still important to maintain a steady workout routine.  Doing so will make you feel better about facing the heat--not to mention the ego boost that you’ll receive when you persevere through an overwhelming slog. 

Women and Allergies

Itchy eyes, a congested nose, sneezing, wheezing and hives: these are symptoms of an allergic reaction to the environment caused when plants release pollen into the air, usually in the spring or fall. Many people use hay fever as a colloquial term for these seasonal allergies and the inflammation of the nose and airways.

The Importance of a Mammogram

A mammogram is a screening test for breast cancer which uses special X-ray images to detect abnormal growths or changes in breast tissue.

Using a digital X-ray machine made especially for breast tissue, a technologist compresses the breast and takes pictures from at least two different angles, creating a set of images for each of your breasts. This set of images is called a mammogram.

What is a Stroke?

What is Stroke?

Stroke is a disease that affects the arteries leading to and within the brain. It is the  No. 5 cause of death and a leading cause of disability in the United States.

A stroke occurs when a blood vessel that carries oxygen and nutrients to the brain is either blocked by a clot or bursts (or ruptures). When that happens , part of the brain cannot get the blood (and oxygen) it needs, so it and brain cells die.

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Interesting Statistics about Stroke

Nearly 800,000 (approximately 795,000) people in the United States have a stroke every year, with about three in four being first-time strokes.

Stroke is the No. 5 cause of death in the United States, killing nearly 130,000 people a year (128,978). That’s one in every 20 deaths.

Someone in the United States has a stroke every 40 seconds.

Every four minutes, someone dies of stroke.

Stroke is a leading cause of long-term disability and the leading preventable cause of disability.

More women than men have strokes each year, in part because women live longer.

Estimates of the overall annual incidence of stroke in US children are 6.4 per 100,000 children (0 to 15 years), with approximately half being hemorrhagic strokes.

87% of strokes are classified as ischemic. An ischemic stroke occurs when a clot or a mass blocks a blood vessel, cutting off blood flow to a part of the brain.

African-Americans are more impacted by stroke than any other racial group within the American population.

Source credit http://www.strokeassociation.org

Our Red Ribbon Heart Provider

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I am Stacey Mott, Family Nurse Practitioner at the Woman's Clinic, P.A. in Jackson, Tennessee. Most women only make one visit to the doctor per year which tends to be with their ob/gyn. Here at the Woman's Clinic we strive to make this visit as convenient and comprehensive as possible. For those in need, we are now offering primary care services along with the many women's health services you have grown accustomed to over the last 60 years. With over 2 decades of nursing experience, I bring my skills from family medicine and cardiology in order to be your provider. Join me and the family at Woman's Clinic as we care for the whole woman... ONE WOMAN AT A TIME.

Conditions that Increase Risk for Heart Disease

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Several medical conditions can increase your risk for heart disease. If you have one of these conditions, you can take steps to control it and lower your risk.

High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart disease. It is a medical condition that occurs when the pressure of the blood in your arteries and other blood vessels is too high. The high pressure, if not controlled, can affect your heart and other major organs of your body, including your kidneys and brain.

High blood pressure is often called a “silent killer” because many people do not notice symptoms to signal high blood pressure. Lowering blood pressure by changes in lifestyle or by medication can reduce your risk for heart disease and heart attack.

High Cholesterol

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance made by the liver or found in certain foods. Your liver makes enough for your body’s needs, but we often get more cholesterol from the foods we eat. If we take in more cholesterol than the body can use, the extra cholesterol can build up in the walls of the arteries, including those of the heart. This leads to narrowing of the arteries and can decrease the blood flow to the heart, brain, kidneys, and other parts of the body.

Some cholesterol is “good,” and some is “bad.” High cholesterol is the term used for high levels of low-density lipoprotein, or LDL, which are considered “bad” because they can lead to heart disease. A higher level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, or HDL, is considered “good” because it provides some protection against heart disease.

A blood test can detect the amount of cholesterol and triglycerides (a related kind of fat) in your blood.

Diabetes

Diabetes mellitus also increases the risk for heart disease. Your body needs glucose (sugar) for energy. Insulin is a hormone made in the pancreas that helps move glucose from the food you eat to your body’s cells. If you have diabetes, your body doesn’t make enough insulin, can’t use its own insulin as well as it should, or both.

Diabetes causes sugars to build up in the blood. The risk of death from heart disease for adults with diabetes is higher than adults who do not have diabetes.1 Talk to your doctor about ways to manage diabetes and control other risk factors.

Reference

  1. CDC. National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017.[PDF- 3 MB]. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Preventions, 2017.

Credit Source https://www.cdc.gov/heartdisease/conditions.htm

Keep Your Heart Healthy

The best way look after your heart is with a healthy lifestyle.

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Be smoke-free 

Being smoke free is one of the best things you can do to protect your heart. Read more about smoking 

Manage your blood cholesterol

Cholesterol is a fatty substance carried in your blood. Your body needs cholesterol to be healthy, but an imbalance of cholesterol in your blood can lead to a heart attack or stroke. Find out more about blood cholesterol and how to manage it 

Manage your blood pressure

Blood pressure isn’t usually something you can feel. If it’s too high, it needs to be treated. Read about blood pressure and what you can do to control high blood pressure

Manage diabetes

It’s important to manage your diabetes to help prevent a heart attack or stroke. For information on managing diabetes, visit the Diabetes Australia website.

Be physically active 

Regular, moderate physical activity is great for your heart health. It’s never too late to start and get the benefits. It’s also important to sit less during your day and break up your sitting time. Find out what you can do about getting active and sitting less 

Achieve and maintain a healthy weight

Maintaining a healthy weight can reduce the risk of heart disease and other health problems. It can help to know your body mass index and waist measurements and what these mean. Find out how 

Enjoy a variety of nutritious foods

Eating a varied diet of healthy foods can help with your weight, blood pressure and cholesterol. Find out more about healthy eating 

There are also specific changes you can make to your diet to help prevent heart disease:

Look after your mental health

We know that there can be a greater risk of heart disease for people who have depression, are socially isolated or do not have good social support. Having a good social life with family and friends can help. 

Depression is more than feeling sad or low. If you feel depressed for more than two weeks, talk to your doctor, a family member or someone you know well. 

For more information about depression, visit the beyondblue website 

Source credit https://www.heartfoundation.org.au/your-heart/keep-your-heart-healthy

Even Busy Women Need the Flu Vaccine

Take time to get a flu vaccine.

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  • CDC recommends a yearly flu vaccine as the first and most important step in protecting against flu viruses.
  • While there are many different flu viruses, a flu vaccine protects against the viruses that research suggests will be most common. (See Vaccine Virus Selection for this season’s vaccine composition.)
  • Flu vaccination can reduce flu illnesses, doctors’ visits, and missed work and school due to flu, as well as prevent flu-related hospitalizations.
  • Everyone 6 months of age and older should get a flu vaccine every year before flu activity begins in their community. CDC recommends getting vaccinated by the end of October, if possible.  Learn more about vaccine timing.
  • CDC recommends use of injectable influenza vaccines (including inactivated influenza vaccines and recombinant influenza vaccines) during 2017-2018. The nasal spray flu vaccine (live attenuated influenza vaccine or LAIV) should not be used during 2017-2018.
  • Vaccination of high risk persons is especially important to decrease their risk of severe flu illness.
  • People at high risk of serious flu complications include young children, pregnant women, people with chronic health conditions like asthma, diabetes or heart and lung disease and people 65 years and older.
  • Vaccination also is important for health care workers, and other people who live with or care for high risk people to keep from spreading flu to them.
  • Children younger than 6 months are at high risk of serious flu illness, but are too young to be vaccinated. People who care for infants should be vaccinated instead.

Source Credit https://www.cdc.gov/flu/consumer/prevention.htm

January is Cervical Cancer Month

What is Cervical Cancer?

When cancer starts in the cervix, it is called cervical cancer. The cervix is the lower, narrow end of the uterus. Also known as the womb, the uterus is where a baby grows when a woman is pregnant. The cervix connects the upper part of the uterus to the vagina (the birth canal).

All women are at risk for cervical cancer. It occurs most often in women over age 30. Each year, about 12,000 women in the United States get cervical cancer and about 4,000 women die from it.

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main cause of cervical cancer. HPV is a common virus that is passed from one person to another during sex. At least half of sexually active people will have HPV at some point in their lives, but few women will get cervical cancer.

Cervical cancer used to be the leading cause of cancer death for women in the United States. However, in the past 40 years, the number of cases of cervical cancer and the number of deaths from cervical cancer have decreased significantly. This decline largely is the result of many women getting regular Pap tests, which can find cervical precancer before it turns into cancer.1 For more information, visit HPV-Associated Cervical Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity.

In 2014 (the most recent year numbers are available)—

  • 12,578 women in the United States were diagnosed with cervical cancer.2
  • 4,115 women in the United States died from cervical cancer.2

This information is from the CDC.  Please visit their website for more important information regarding Cervical Cancer.

BRAC Analysis

Breast and Ovarian Cancers Can Run in Families

Your mother or grandmother. Your sister or daughter. Your father’s sister, niece, or other women from your father’s side of the family. If you or your close relatives have a history of breast or ovarian cancer, there may be an inherited risk that runs in your family.

In every family, certain traits are shared and passed on from one generation to the next. Most obvious are physical traits such as eye or hair color, or resemblances that parents and children share. Less obvious are inherited genetic traits that control the tendency to develop specific diseases, such as certain cancers.

Many people don’t realize that about 10% of breast and ovarian cancers are hereditary–that is, they are due to a mutated (altered) gene passed on from parent to child. You don’t actually inherit cancer, but rather you inherit a higher risk of developing it.

Does Breast or Ovarian Cancer Run in Your Family?

If there’s a pattern of breast and/or ovarian cancer in your family, you can reduce your risk. You may benefit from learning more about your own risk. Current cancer research shows that early detection–along with proactive medical care– has been proven to help reduce cancer risk, and save lives.

Essure!

Essure is a gentle, hormone-free birth control procedure–without cutting or the risks of getting your tubes tied. Essure is a permanent birth control procedure that works with your body to create a natural barrier against pregnancy. This gentle procedure can be performed in a doctor’s office in minutes. Unlike some forms of birth control, Essure blocks the egg and sperm from meeting, so conception never occurs.

 

Trusted by women and doctors since 2002, Essure is covered by most insurance providers. If the Essure procedure is performed in a doctor’s office, depending on your specific insurance plan, payment may be as low as simple co-pay.

The Essure procedure involves placing soft, flexible micro-inserts into the fallopian tubes. These are made from materials that have been used successfully for many years in cardiac stents and medical devices in other parts of the body.

Essure offers women what no other birth control ever has

  • No cutting
  • No going under general anesthesia
  • No slowing down to recover
  • No hormones
  • Peace of mind–your doctor can confirm when you can rely on Essure for birth control
  • Short procedure time–Essure takes only about 10 minutes to perform

How does it work?

  1. An Essure-certified doctor inserts soft, flexible micro-inserts into the fallopian tubes. No incision is needed because these tiny inserts are delivered through the vagina and cervix.
  2. Over the next several weeks, a natural barrier forms around the micro-inserts and prevents sperm from reaching the eggs. The ovaries will continue to release eggs, but they will be absorbed back into the body.
  3. After three months, it’s time to get an Essure Confirmation Test to verify you’re protected from the worries of unplanned pregnancy. The test uses a dye and special type of x-ray to ensure the fallopian tubes are blocked. Until that time, you must continue using another form of birth control.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can I trust the Essure procedure?
Yes, Essure is 99.8% effective. In four years of clinical trials, there have been no pregnancies among Essure users.

Is the procedure painful?
Generally, no. Some women report mild discomfort or cramping, similar to a normal monthly cycle during or after the procedure.

How long is the recovery?
Women are typically able to go home within 45 minutes of having the procedure and nearly all return to normal activities within one to two days.

Is Essure reversible?
No, the Essure procedure is not reversible. Like a vasectomy or tubal ligation, Essure is permanent, so you should be sure you do not want to have children in the future.

Will I still have a period?
Yes, you will still have a period, though some Essure users find that their period changes afterward, becoming slightly lighter or heavier. These changes may be the result of discontinuing hormone-based birth control and are often temporary.

 

Essure!

Essure is a gentle, hormone-free birth control procedure–without cutting or the risks of getting your tubes tied. Essure is a permanent birth control procedure that works with your body to create a natural barrier against pregnancy. This gentle procedure can be performed in a doctor’s office in minutes. Unlike some forms of birth control, Essure blocks the egg and sperm from meeting, so conception never occurs.

Trusted by women and doctors since 2002, Essure is covered by most insurance providers. If the Essure procedure is performed in a doctor’s office, depending on your specific insurance plan, payment may be as low as simple co-pay.

The Essure procedure involves placing soft, flexible micro-inserts into the fallopian tubes. These are made from materials that have been used successfully for many years in cardiac stents and medical devices in other parts of the body.

Essure offers women what no other birth control ever has

  • No cutting
  • No going under general anesthesia
  • No slowing down to recover
  • No hormones
  • Peace of mind–your doctor can confirm when you can rely on Essure for birth control
  • Short procedure time–Essure takes only about 10 minutes to perform

How does it work?

  1. An Essure-certified doctor inserts soft, flexible micro-inserts into the fallopian tubes. No incision is needed because these tiny inserts are delivered through the vagina and cervix.
  2. Over the next several weeks, a natural barrier forms around the micro-inserts and prevents sperm from reaching the eggs. The ovaries will continue to release eggs, but they will be absorbed back into the body.
  3. After three months, it’s time to get an Essure Confirmation Test to verify you’re protected from the worries of unplanned pregnancy. The test uses a dye and special type of x-ray to ensure the fallopian tubes are blocked. Until that time, you must continue using another form of birth control.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can I trust the Essure procedure?
Yes, Essure is 99.8% effective. In four years of clinical trials, there have been no pregnancies among Essure users.

Is the procedure painful?
Generally, no. Some women report mild discomfort or cramping, similar to a normal monthly cycle during or after the procedure.

How long is the recovery?
Women are typically able to go home within 45 minutes of having the procedure and nearly all return to normal activities within one to two days.

Is Essure reversible?
No, the Essure procedure is not reversible. Like a vasectomy or tubal ligation, Essure is permanent, so you should be sure you do not want to have children in the future.

Will I still have a period?
Yes, you will still have a period, though some Essure users find that their period changes afterward, becoming slightly lighter or heavier. These changes may be the result of discontinuing hormone-based birth control and are often temporary.

Awareness!

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"Statistics show that more women die each year of cardiovascular disease than all other causes of death combined. That is more than 500,000 women in the United States each year! Research and clinical outcomes show that these deaths are largely preventable. 

We currently offer cancer and mammogram screenings for early detection, so it just makes sense that we also offer early detection and prevention of heart disease -our #1 KILLER of women! 

Our experienced provider, Stacey Mott MSN, FNP-BC, will employ proven methods of risk stratification including family history and specialized lipid and inflammatory testing to provide an individualized prevention plan. This plan may include education, diet and lifestyle changes, prescription medications, or more extensive cardiac evaluation and diagnostic testing. Prompt follow-up with cardiology will be coordinated as needed. 

 

Stacey has worked in the Jackson area as a Registered Nurse since 1994. Since completing her training as a Family Nurse Practitioner in 2010, she has practiced in family medicine and cardiology. As a graduate of the Bale-Doneen Preceptorship, she specializes in preventative care for those at high risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and chronic disease management. She is also available for the primary care needs of the Woman's Clinic patients who do not have a separate, established primary care provider.

 

Most women only make one visit to the doctor per year and we strive to make this visit as convenient and comprehensive as possible.This is part of fulfilling the Woman's Clinic mission to provide the best in quality medical care combined with compassionate concern for the patient as an individual…ONE WOMAN AT A TIME!"

Pregnancy Medications

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Medications During Pregnancy and Lactation All medications cross the placenta and many have an adverse effect on your baby. Many medications are also excreted in the breast milk. Therefore, it is best to avoid taking any medication during your pregnancy, especially in the first trimester and while nursing. However, if other remedies do not give you relief, taking medication may be necessary. Here is a list of medications we think are relatively safe to take during pregnancy and lactation:

  • Headache: Tylenol, two Extra Strength tablets every 4 hours for headache.
  • Nausea: Unisom (25mg sleep tablets OTC 1/4 AM 1/4 PM and whole at night) along with Vitamin B6.
  • Sinus Congestion & Allergies: Plain Sudafed meltaway or liquid, Sinutab II, Tylenol Sinus or Allergy, Tylenol PM, or Benadryl, Claritin, Claritin-D, Zyrtec D, Allegra or Allegra D, according to directions.
  • Cold: Tylenol Cold.
  • Cough: Plain Robitussin or Robitussin DM, Delsym or Mucinex, according to directions. Cough drops are permitted.
  • Sore Throat: Chloraseptic throat spray or lozenges, according to directions.
  • Nasal Congestion: Ocean mist, as directed, or any saline nasal spray.
  • Indigestion: Maalox liquid or tablets, Tunis Ex, Gaviscon, or Mylanta, as needed.
  • Acid Reflux: Pepcid, Pepcid Complete, Tagamet or Zantac, Prilosec, Prevacid.
  • Constipation: Metamucil, Miralax, Citrucel, FiberCon, Colace or Generic Docusate, as directed. Milk of Magnesia caplets as directed for severe constipation. Glycerin suppositories or Fleets enema.
  • Hemorrhoids: Anusol or Anusol HC cream or suppositories as directed. Tucks and Amercaine spray or creme are helpful.
  • Leg Cramps: Tunis, two tablets each day.
  • Topical Creams: Hydrocortisone Cream or Neosporin.
  • Diarrhea: Imodium or Imodium AD as directed.
  • Eye Drops: Visine eye drops or Stye Relief.
  • Gas: Mylanta Gas, Mylicon, Gas-X or Phazyme, as directed.
  • Vaginal yeast symptoms as itching and/or discharge without odor: Monistat 7 cream or suppositories, as directed on box.